CLOVE

Used as a fragrance and spice for over 2 millennia by the Chinese, given credit for protecting against the Bubonic plague throughout Europe and more recently with its starring role as the top note in our spicy warm wood Red Santal. The humble clove has a history as diverse as it is rich.

When Isaac our perfumer was last in Amsterdam, we asked him what scent he most associated with Holland. Clove was at the top of his list alongside cinnamon and other warm spices. And it’s no surprise, Clove was first introduced to the Netherlands as an original trade by the Dutch East India Company and has long held a special place in the Dutch kitchen where it’s esteemed both as a culinary ingredient and a home remedy.

When Isaac our perfumer was last in Amsterdam, we asked him what scent he most associated with Holland. Clove was at the top of his list.

So, what are the uses of clove bud oil? To name a few…

  • For toothache: perhaps the oldest and most common use. The germicidal properties make it very effective for relieving toothache and sore gums. Apply twice daily in diluted form (e.g. coconut, olive, or almond oil – at least 4:1) by using a cotton swab directly to the area.
  • For headaches: mix diluted clove bud oil with a little salt and apply to the temple or neck. The anti-inflammatory qualities of the clove bud oil can release tension and ease inflammation – which are often the causes of headaches.
  • Insect repellent: for those last summer nights out on the porch, try burning some clove bud oil in an oil burner or splash on outdoor surfaces to deter insects.

Take care: many essential oils (including clove bud) are allergens. If you intend to use on inflamed or damaged skin or gums, test first on a small patch of healthy skin to ensure you don’t have a reaction. Pregnant women or people using medication should be careful about essential oil use.

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